Examples of swarms


Bee swarm on a boat at Carolina Beach


Bee Swarm Under Deck


Swarm on side of a hive

Bee Swarm Removal

REMOVING HONEY BEE SWARMS FROM YOUR PROPERTY

Our club has several members who can help the public with "nuisance" honey bees; the bees will be removed humanely from your property.

Contact Nicole Jones at 910 (547-8127) or send her an if you notice either of the following and would like us to help:

- A large mass or clump (swarm) of honey bees in your yard, perhaps hanging on a tree branch, mailbox, swing set or the underside of a picnic table or bbq grill.

- OR you observe a large number of honey bees entering and exiting a small opening, such as on a porch column, eave of a roof or hollow tree.

Swarming is the natural process by which a new honey bee colony is formed when a queen bee leaves the original hive location with a large group of worker bees. The swarm can contain thousands to tens of thousands of bees.

After they leave the original hive, the swarm will usually find a place to rest (often in the strangest places) while scout bees look for a new hive location.

A honey bee swarm is generally not aggressive, especially when left alone. Do not approach the swarm as they take temporary respite near your home, and keep children and pets away.

DO NOT SPRAY THEM WITH WATER OR PESTICIDES!!!

One of our club members will assess the situation and humanely capture the swarm and remove it from your property, if possible, at no charge. If the swarm has already found it's new home in a tree or structure on your property, removal may be more complicated.

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO KILL THE BEES WITH PESTICIDES!

This will only kill the foraging adult bees that you see. Structural bee removal requires removing the hive the honey bees have constructed inside the cavity (wax, honey, larvae) and repairing the opening so another swarm would not find it attractive, repeating the cycle. You may incur some costs in this situation, which will be agreed to up front between you and the beekeeper.